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Tax Disc Phase Out & New Regulations To Follow

At the start of October this year drivers in the UK will no longer be required to display a tax disc in the window of their car in order to prove that they have paid the applicable fee and are thus allowed to use the roads unhindered.

At the start of October this year drivers in the UK will no longer be required to display a tax disc in the window of their car in order to prove that they have paid the applicable fee and are thus allowed to use the roads unhindered. But with tax discs being eliminated after 93 years in service, there are some regulatory changes which need to be taken onboard in order to avoid penalties as the deadline draws near.
 
The one thing that has not changed is that those people who are found to have violated the rules will be subject to a fine of up to £1000, which is a big chunk of cash by most standards and something that drivers will no doubt be keen to avoid going forwards.
 
So while tax discs may be going the way of the dodo, there are still costs to cover when running your car that go on top of whatever finance package and fuel expenses you already have to work into your household budget.
 
Those looking to buy used cars will need to take the most care around the new rules, because from October the ability to transfer any existing tax paid on a vehicle by its previous owner will go out the window. This means that buyers will have to tax the car as soon as possible, because using it on the road without doing so could lead to problems if they are caught by the police using their number place scanning cameras.
 
The good news for sellers is that the tax they have purchased for their vehicle can be refunded if they decide to part ways with the vehicle. So even if having some tax remaining used to be an advertised incentive to coax potential buyers into a sale, the rule changes will see this practice eliminated.
 
The typical fine levied against people who are caught driving an untaxed vehicle is £80, in addition to the cost of covering the tax they owe on the vehicle which has not been paid up to that point.
 
The Telegraph reports that some experts are confident that there will be benefits to average motorists as a result of the tax disc being eliminated in the UK. 
 
Insurance premiums may actually go down thanks to this change, because it will mean that fewer people will risk driving an untaxed car on the roads. And of course an untaxed vehicle will also be uninsured, so it is clear to see why there could be a number of advantages for most people, even if there are new rules to learn in the process.
 
The digitisation of public services has been gradual in many areas, although it seems like this is picking up momentum at the moment. Following on from the discontinuation of the tax disc, next year will see driving license rules altered so that the paper element is no longer required to be kept by those who have passed their tests.
 
This, like the tax disc, seemed like a glaring anachronism in the second decade of the 21st century. And since law enforcement organisations have been using digital technologies to take on those who work outside the rules for years anyway it will be something of a relief for all involved once paper elements like this are taken out of the picture.
 
It will be interesting to see whether the change in the rule relating to tax being carried over after the sale of a used car will convince more people to head to dedicated dealerships rather than buying privately and risking issues in this area.
 
Certainly it will be worth checking to ensure that all parties involved in a transaction are aware of the obligations they face so that such problems do not arise and used cars can still be bought and sold smoothly.

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